BCOE&M 2.1.10: BJCP 2015 Styles

# Style Description
01A American Light Lager

Highly carbonated, very light-bodied, nearly flavorless lager designed to be consumed very cold. Very refreshing and thirst quenching.
Commercial Examples: Miller Lite, Bud Light, Coors Light, Old Milwaukee Light, Keystone Light, Michelob Light.

01B American Lager

A very pale, highly-carbonated, light-bodied, well-attenuated lager with a very neutral flavor profile and low bitterness. Served very cold, it can be a very refreshing and thirst quenching drink.
Commercial Examples: Pabst Blue Ribbon, Miller High Life, Budweiser, Grain Belt Premium Lager, Coors Original, Special Export.

01C Cream Ale

A clean, well-attenuated, flavorful American lawnmower beer. Easily drinkable and refreshing, with more character than typical American lagers.
Commercial Examples: Genesee Cream Ale, Little Kings Cream Ale, Sleeman Cream Ale, Liebotschaner Cream Ale, New Glarus Spotted Cow, Old Style.

01D American Wheat Beer

Refreshing wheat beers that can display more hop character and less yeast character than their German cousins. A clean fermentation character allows bready, doughy, or grainy wheat flavors to be complemented by hop flavor and bitterness rather than yeast qualities.
Commercial Examples: Bell’s Oberon, Goose Island 312 Urban Wheat Ale, Widmer Hefeweizen, Boulevard Wheat Beer.

02A International Pale Lager

A highly-attenuated pale lager without strong flavors, typically well-balanced and highly carbonated. Served cold, it is refreshing and thirst-quenching.
Commercial Examples: Heineken, Corona Extra, Asahi Super Dry, Full Sail Session Premium Lager, Birra Moretti, Red Stripe, Singha, Devils Backbone Gold Leaf Lager.

02B International Amber Lager

A well-attenuated malty amber lager with an interesting caramel or toast quality and restrained bitterness. Usually fairly well-attenuated, and can have an adjunct quality to it. Smooth, easily-drinkable lager character.
Commercial Examples: Schell’s Oktoberfest, Capital Winter Skal, Dos Equis Amber, Yuengling Lager, Brooklyn Lager.

02C International Dark Lager

A darker and somewhat sweeter version of international pale lager with a little more body and flavor, but equally restrained in bitterness. The low bitterness leaves the malt as the primary flavor element, and the low hop levels provide very little in the way of balance.
Commercial Examples: Dixie Blackened Voodoo, Shiner Bock, San Miguel Dark, Baltika 4, Saint Pauli Girl Dark.

03A Czech Pale Lager

A lighter-bodied, rich, refreshing, hoppy, bitter, crisp pale Czech lager having the familiar flavors of the stronger Czech Pilsner-type beer but in a lower alcohol, lighter-bodied, and slightly less intense format.
Commercial Examples: Uneticke Pivo 10°, Pivovar Kout na Sumave Koutska 10°, Novosad Glassworks Brewery Hutske Vycepni 8°, Cernyy Orel Svetle 11°, Breznak Svetle Vycepni Pivo, Notch Session Pils.

03B Czech Premium Pale Lager

Rich, characterful pale Czech lager, with considerable malt and hop character and a long, crisp finish. Complex yet well-balanced and refreshing. The malt flavors are complex for a Pilsner-type beer, and the bitterness is strong but clean and without harshness, which gives a rounded impression that enhances drinkability.
Commercial Examples: Kout na Sumave Koutska 12°, Uneticka 12°, Pilsner Urquell, Bernard Svatecn

03C Czech Amber Lager

Malt-driven amber Czech lager with hop character that can vary from low to quite significant. The malt flavors can vary quite a bit, leading to different interpretations ranging from drier, bready, and slightly biscuity to sweeter and somewhat caramelly.
Commercial Examples: Cerny Orel polotmava 12°, Primator polotmavy 13°, Jihlavsky Radnicni Pivovar Zikmund, Pivovar Vysoky Chlumec Demon, Pivovar Benesov Sedm kuli, Bernard Jantar.

03D Czech Dark Lager

A rich, dark, malty Czech lager with a roast character that can vary from almost absent to quite prominent. Malty with an interesting and complex flavor profile, with variable levels of hopping providing a range of possible interpretations.
Commercial Examples: Kout na Sumav Tmavy 14°, Pivovar Breznice Herold, U Fleku, Budvar Tmavy Lezak, Bohemian Brewery Cherny Bock 4, Devils Backbone Moran, Notch Cerne Pivo.

04A Munich Helles

A clean, malty, gold-colored German lager with a smooth grainy-sweet malty flavor and a soft, dry finish. Subtle spicy, floral, or herbal hops and restrained bitterness help keep the balance malty but not sweet, which helps make this beer a refreshing, everyday drink.
Commercial Examples: Weihenstephaner Original, Hacker-Pschorr Munchner Gold, Burgerbrau Wolznacher Hell Naturtrub, Paulaner Premium Lager, Spaten Premium Lager, Lowenbrau Original.

04B Festbier

A smooth, clean, pale German lager with a moderately strong malty flavor and a light hop character. Deftly balances strength and drinkability, with a palate impression and finish that encourages drinking. Showcases elegant German malt flavors without becoming too heavy or filling.
Commercial Examples: Paulaner Wiesn, Lowenbrau Oktoberfestbier, Hofbrau Festbier, Hacker-Pschorr Superior Festbier, Augustiner Oktoberfest, Schonramer Gold.

04C Helles Bock

A relatively pale, strong, malty German lager beer with a nicely attenuated finish that enhances drinkability. The hop character is generally more apparent than in other bocks.
Commercial Examples: Ayinger Maibock, Mahr’s Bock, Hacker-Pschorr Hubertus Bock, Altenmunster Maibock, Capital Maibock, Einbecker Mai-Urbock, Blind Tiger Maibock.

05A German Leichtbier

A pale, highly-attenuated, light-bodied German lager with lower alcohol and calories than normal-strength beers. Moderately bitter with noticeable malt and hop flavors, the beer is still interesting to drink.
Commercial Examples: Bitburger Light, Beck’s Light, Paulaner Munchner Hell Leicht, Paulaner Premium Leicht, Mahr’s Leicht.

05B Kolsch

A clean, crisp, delicately-balanced beer usually with a very subtle fruit and hop character. Subdued maltiness throughout leads into a pleasantly well-attenuated and refreshing finish. Freshness makes a huge difference with this beer, as the delicate character can fade quickly with age.
Commercial Examples: Fruh Kolsch, Reissdorf Kolsch, Gaffel Kolsch, Sunner Kolsch, Muhlen Kolsch, Sion Kolsch.

05C German Exportbier

A pale, well-balanced, smooth German lager that is slightly stronger than the average beer with a moderate body and a mild, aromatic hop and malt character.
Commercial Examples: DAB Original, Dortmunder Union Export, Dortmunder Kronen, Great Lakes Dortmunder Gold, Barrel House Duveneck’s Dortmunder, Gordon Biersch Golden Export, Flensburger Gold.

05D German Pils

A light-bodied, highly-attenuated, gold-colored, bottom-fermented bitter German beer showing excellent head retention and an elegant, floral hop aroma. Crisp, clean, and refreshing, a German Pils showcases the finest quality German malt and hops.
Commercial Examples: Schonramer Pils, Trumer Pils, Konig Pilsener, Paulaner Premium Pils, Stoudt Pils, Troegs Sunshine Pils.

06A Marzen

An elegant, malty German amber lager with a clean, rich, toasty and bready malt flavor, restrained bitterness, and a dry finish that encourages another drink. The overall malt impression is soft, elegant, and complex, with a rich aftertaste that is never cloying or heavy.
Commercial Examples: Buergerliches Brauhaus Saalfeld Ur-Saalfelder, Paulaner Oktoberfest, Ayinger Oktoberfest-Marzen, Hacker-Pschorr Original Oktoberfest, Weltenburg Kloster Anno 1050.

06B Rauchbier

Medium body. Medium to medium-high carbonation. Smooth lager character. Significant astringent, phenolic harshness is inappropriate.
Commercial Examples: Schlenkerla Rauchbier Marzen, Kaiserdom Rauchbier, Eisenbahn Defumada, Spezial Rauchbier Marzen, Victory Scarlet Fire Rauchbier.

06C Dunkels Bock

A dark, strong, malty German lager beer that emphasizes the malty-rich and somewhat toasty qualities of continental malts without being sweet in the finish.
Commercial Examples: Einbecker Ur-Bock Dunkel, Kneitinger Bock, Aass Bock, Great Lakes Rockefeller Bock, New Glarus Uff-da Bock, Penn Brewery St. Nikolaus Bock.

07A Vienna Lager

A moderate-strength amber lager with a soft, smooth maltiness and moderate bitterness, yet finishing relatively dry. The malt flavor is clean, bready-rich, and somewhat toasty, with an elegant impression derived from quality base malts and process, not specialty malts and adjuncts.
Commercial Examples: Clipper City Heavy Seas Vienna Lager, Cuauhtemoc Noche Buena, Chuckanut Vienna Lager, Devils Backbone Vienna Lager, Schell’s Firebrick, Figueroa Mountain Danish Red Lager.

07B Altbier

A well-balanced, well-attenuated, bitter yet malty, clean, and smooth, amber- to copper-colored German beer. The bitterness is balanced by the malt richness, but the malt intensity and character can range from moderate to high (the bitterness increases with the malt richness).
Commercial Examples: Zum Uerige, Im Fuuchschen, Schumacher, Zum Schluussel, Schlosser Alt, Bolten Alt, Diebels Alt, Frankenheim Alt, Southampton Alt, BluCreek Altbier.

07C Kellerbier

Young, unfiltered, unpasteurized versions of the traditional German beer styles, traditionally served on tap from the lagering vessel. The name literally means "cellar beer" - implying a young, fresh beer served straight from the lagering cellar. Since this serving method can be applied to a wide range of beers, the style is somewhat hard to pin down. However, there are several common variants that can be described and used as templates for other versions. Sometimes described as Naturtrub or naturally cloudy. Also sometimes called Zwickelbier, after the name of the tap used to sample from a lagering tank.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify whether the entry is a Munich Kellerbier (pale, based on Helles) or a Franconian Kellerbier (amber, based on Marzen). The entrant MAY specify another type of Kellerbier based on other base styles such as Pils, Bock, Schwarzbier, but should supply a style description for judges.

08A Munich Dunkel

Characterized by depth, richness and complexity typical of darker Munich malts with the accompanying Maillard products. Deeply bready-toasty, often with chocolate-like flavors in the freshest examples, but never harsh, roasty, or astringent; a decidedly malt-balanced beer, yet still easily drinkable.
Commercial Examples: Ayinger Altbairisch Dunkel, Hacker-Pschorr Alt Munich Dark, Weltenburger Kloster Barock-Dunkel, Ettaler Kloster Dunkel, Chuckanut Dunkel.

08B Schwarzbier

A dark German lager that balances roasted yet smooth malt flavors with moderate hop bitterness. The lighter body, dryness, and lack of a harsh, burnt, or heavy aftertaste helps make this beer quite drinkable.
Commercial Examples: Kostritzer Schwarzbier, Kulmbacher Monchshof Premium Schwarzbier, Original Badebier, Einbecker Schwarzbier, TAPS Schwarzbier, Devils Backbone Schwartz Bier.

09A Doppelbock

A strong, rich, and very malty German lager that can have both pale and dark variants. The darker versions have more richly-developed, deeper malt flavors, while the paler versions have slightly more hops and dryness.
Commercial Examples: Dark Versions - Andechser Doppelbock Dunkel, Ayinger Celebrator, Paulaner Salvator, Spaten Optimator, Troegs Troegenator, Weihenstephaner Korbinian. Pale Versions - Eggenberg Urbock 23, EKU 28, Plank Bavarian Heller Doppelbock.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify whether the entry is a pale or a dark variant.

09B Eisbock

A strong, full-bodied, rich, and malty dark German lager often with a viscous quality and strong flavors. Even though flavors are concentrated, the alcohol should be smooth and warming, not burning.
Commercial Examples: Kulmbacher Eisbock, Eggenberg Urbock Dunkel Eisbock, Niagara Eisbock, Southampton Double Ice Bock, Capital Eisphyre.

09C Baltic Porter

Baltic Porter often has the malt flavors reminiscent of an English brown porter and the restrained roast of a schwarzbier, but with a higher OG and alcohol content than either. Very complex, with multi-layered malt and dark fruit flavors.
Commercial Examples: Sinebrychoff Porter (Finland), Okocim Porter (Poland), Aldaris Porteris (Latvia), Baltika 6 Porter (Russia), Utenos Porter (Lithuania), Stepan Razin Porter (Russia), Zywiec Porter (Poland), Nogne o Porter (Norway), Neuzeller Kloster-Brou Neuzeller Porter (Germany).

10A Weissbier

A pale, refreshing German wheat beer with high carbonation, dry finish, a fluffy mouthfeel, and a distinctive banana-and-clove yeast character.
Commercial Examples: Weihenstephaner Hefeweissbier, Schneider Weisse Weizenhell, Paulaner Hefe-Weizen, Hacker-Pschorr Weisse, Ayinger Brau Weisse.

10B Dunkels Weissbier

A moderately dark German wheat beer with a distinctive banana-and-clove yeast character, supported by a toasted bread or caramel malt flavor. Highly carbonated and refreshing, with a creamy, fluffy texture and light finish that encourages drinking.
Commercial Examples: Weihenstephaner Hefeweissbier Dunkel, Ayinger Ur-Weisse, Franziskaner Dunkel Hefe-Weisse, Ettaler Weissbier Dunkel, Hacker-Pschorr Weisse Dark, Tucher Dunkles Hefe Weizen.

10C Weizenbock

A strong, malty, fruity, wheat-based ale combining the best malt and yeast flavors of a weissbier (pale or dark) with the malty-rich flavor, strength, and body of a bock (standard or doppelbock). A weissbier brewed to bock or doppelbock strength. Schneider also produces an Eisbock version. Pale and dark versions exist, although dark are more common. Pale versions have less rich malt complexity and often more hops, as with doppelbocks. Lightly oxidized Maillard products can produce some rich, intense flavors and aromas that are often seen in aged imported commercial products; fresher versions will not have this character. Well-aged examples might also take on a slight sherry-like complexity.
Commercial Examples: Dark - Schneider Aventinus, Schneider Aventinus Eisbock, Eisenbahn Vigorosa, Plank Bavarian Dunkler Weizenbock; Pale - Weihenstephaner Vitus, Plank Bavarian Heller Weizenbock.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify whether the entry is a pale or a dark variant.

11A Ordinary Bitter

Low gravity, low alcohol levels, and low carbonation make this an easy-drinking session beer. The malt profile can vary in flavor and intensity, but should never override the overall bitter impression. Drinkability is a critical component of the style.
Commercial Examples: Fuller’s Chiswick Bitter, Adnams Bitter, Young’s Bitter, Greene King IPA, Brains Bitter, Tetley’s Original Bitter.

11B Best Bitter

A flavorful, yet refreshing, session beer. Some examples can be more malt balanced, but this should not override the overall bitter impression. Drinkability is a critical component of the style.
Commercial Examples: Timothy Taylor Landlord, Fuller’s London Pride, Coniston Bluebird Bitter, Adnams SSB, Young’s Special, Shepherd Neame Masterbrew Bitter.

11C Strong Bitter

An average-strength to moderately-strong English bitter ale. The balance may be fairly even between malt and hops to somewhat bitter. Drinkability is a critical component of the style. A rather broad style that allows for considerable interpretation by the brewer.
Commercial Examples: Shepherd Neame Bishop’s Finger, Young’s Ram Rod, Samuel Smith’s Old Brewery Pale Ale, Bass Ale, Whitbread Pale Ale, Shepherd Neame Spitfire.

12A English Golden Ale

A hop-forward, average-strength to moderately-strong pale bitter. Drinkability and a refreshing quality are critical components of the style.
Commercial Examples: Hop Back’s Summer Lightning, Golden Hill’s Exmoor Gold, Oakham’s Jeffrey Hudson Bitter, Fuller’s Discovery, Kelham Island’s Pale Rider, Crouch Vale’s Brewers Gold, Morland Old Golden Hen.

12B Australian Sparkling Ale

Smooth and balanced, all components merge together with similar intensities. Moderate flavors showcasing Australian ingredients. Large flavor dimension. Very drinkable, suited to a hot climate. Relies on yeast character.
Commercial Examples: Coopers Sparkling Ale, Coopers Original Pale Ale.

12C English IPA

A hoppy, moderately-strong, very well-attenuated pale English ale with a dry finish and a hoppy aroma and flavor. Classic English ingredients provide the best flavor profile.
Commercial Examples: Freeminer Trafalgar IPA, Fuller’s Bengal Lancer IPA, Worthington White Shield, Ridgeway IPA, Emerson’s 1812 IPA, Meantime India Pale Ale, Summit India Pale Ale, Samuel Smith’s India Ale, Hampshire Pride of Romsey IPA, Burton Bridge Empire IPA, Marston’s Old Empire, Belhaven Twisted Thistle IPA.

13A Dark Mild

A dark, low-gravity, malt-focused English session ale readily suited to drinking in quantity. Refreshing, yet flavorful, with a wide range of dark malt or dark sugar expression.
Commercial Examples: Moorhouse’s Black Cat, Cain’s Dark Mild, Theakston Traditional Mild, Highgate Mild, Brain’s Dark, Banks’s Dark Mild.

13B English Brown Ale

A malty, brown caramel-centric English ale without the roasted flavors of a Porter.
Commercial Examples: Black Sheep Riggwelter Yorkshire Ale, Wychwood Hobgoblin, Maxim Double Maxim, Newcastle Brown Ale, Samuel Smith’s Nut Brown Ale.

13C English Porter

A moderate-strength brown beer with a restrained roasty character and bitterness. May have a range of roasted flavors, generally without burnt qualities, and often has a chocolate-caramel-malty profile. .
Commercial Examples: Fuller’s London Porter, Samuel Smith Taddy Porter, Burton Bridge Burton Porter, RCH Old Slug Porter, Nethergate Old Growler Porter.

14A Scottish Light

A malt-focused, generally caramelly beer with perhaps a few esters and occasionally a butterscotch aftertaste. Hops only to balance and support the malt. The malt character can range from dry and grainy to rich, toasty, and caramelly, but is never roasty and especially never has a peat smoke character.
Commercial Examples: McEwan’s 60.

14B Scottish Heavy

A malt-focused, generally caramelly beer with perhaps a few esters and occasionally a butterscotch aftertaste. Hops only to balance and support the malt. The malt character can range from dry and grainy to rich, toasty, and caramelly, but is never roasty and especially never has a peat smoke character.
Commercial Examples: Caledonia Smooth, Orkney Raven ale, Broughton Greenmantle Ale, McEwan’s 70, Tennent’s Special Ale.

14C Scottish Export

A malt-focused, generally caramelly beer with perhaps a few esters and occasionally a butterscotch aftertaste. Hops only to balance and support the malt. The malt character can range from dry and grainy to rich, toasty, and caramelly, but is never roasty and especially never has a peat smoke character.
Commercial Examples: Orkney Dark Island, Belhaven Scottish ale, Broughton Exciseman’s ale, Weasel Boy Plaid Ferret Scottish ale.

15A Irish Red Ale

An easy-drinking pint, often with subtle flavors. Slightly malty in the balance sometimes with an initial soft toffee/caramel sweetness, a slightly grainy-biscuity palate, and a touch of roasted dryness in the finish. Some versions can emphasize the caramel and sweetness more, while others will favor the grainy palate and roasted dryness.
Commercial Examples: O’Hara’s Irish Red Ale, Franciscan Well Rebel Red, Smithwick’s Irish Ale, Kilkenny Irish Beer, Caffrey’s Irish Ale, Wexford Irish Cream Ale.

15B Irish Stout

A black beer with a pronounced roasted flavor, often similar to coffee. The balance can range from fairly even to quite bitter, with the more balanced versions having a little malty sweetness and the bitter versions being quite dry. Draught versions typically are creamy from a nitro pour, but bottled versions will not have this dispense-derived character. The roasted flavor can be dry and coffee-like to somewhat chocolaty.
Commercial Examples: Guinness Draught, O’Hara’s Irish Stout, Beamish Irish Stout, Murphy’s Irish Stout, Harpoon Boston Irish Stout.

15C Irish Extra Stout

A fuller-bodied black beer with a pronounced roasted flavor, often similar to coffee and dark chocolate with some malty complexity. The balance can range from moderately bittersweet to bitter, with the more balanced versions having up to moderate malty richness and the bitter versions being quite dry.
Commercial Examples: Guinness Extra Stout, O’Hara’s Leann Follain.

16A Sweet Stout

A very dark, sweet, full-bodied, slightly roasty ale that can suggest coffee-and-cream, or sweetened espresso.
Commercial Examples: Mackeson’s XXX Stout, Watney’s Cream Stout, St. Peter’s Cream Stout, Marston’s Oyster Stout, Samuel Adams Cream Stout, Left Hand Milk Stout, Lancaster Milk Stout.

16B Oatmeal Stout

A very dark, full-bodied, roasty, malty ale with a complementary oatmeal flavor. The sweetness, balance, and oatmeal impression can vary considerably.
Commercial Examples: Samuel Smith Oatmeal Stout, Young’s Oatmeal Stout, McAuslan Oatmeal Stout, Maclay’s Oat Malt Stout, Broughton Kinmount Willie Oatmeal Stout, Anderson Valley Barney Flats Oatmeal Stout, Troegs Oatmeal Stout, New Holland The Poet, Goose Island Oatmeal Stout, Wolaver’s Oatmeal Stout.

16C Tropical Stout

A very dark, sweet, fruity, moderately strong ale with smooth roasty flavors without a burnt harshness.
Commercial Examples: Lion Stout (Sri Lanka), Dragon Stout (Jamaica), ABC Stout (Singapore), Royal Extra "The Lion Stout" (Trinidad), Jamaica Stout (Jamaica).

16D Foreign Extra Stout

A very dark, moderately strong, fairly dry, stout with prominent roast flavors.
Commercial Examples: Guinness Foreign Extra Stout, Ridgeway Foreign Export Stout, Coopers Best Extra Stout, Elysian Dragonstooth Stout.

17A English Strong Ale

An ale of respectable alcoholic strength, traditionally bottled-conditioned and cellared. Can have a wide range of interpretations, but most will have varying degrees of malty richness, late hops and bitterness, fruity esters, and alcohol warmth. Judges should allow for a significant range in character, as long as the beer is within the alcohol strength range and has an interesting "English" character, it likely fits the style. The malt and adjunct flavors and intensity can vary widely, but any combination should result in an agreeable palate experience.
Commercial Examples: Fuller’s 1845, Young’s Special London Ale, Harvey’s Elizabethan Ale, J.W. Lees Manchester Star, Sarah Hughes Dark Ruby Mild, Samuel Smith’s Winter Welcome, Fuller’s ESB, Adnams Broadside, Young’s Winter Warmer.

17B Old Ale

An ale of moderate to fairly significant alcoholic strength, bigger than standard beers, though usually not as strong or rich as barleywine. Often tilted towards a maltier balance. "It should be a warming beer of the type that is best drunk in half pints by a warm fire on a cold winter’s night" - Michael Jackson.
Commercial Examples: Gale’s Prize Old Ale, Burton Bridge Olde Expensive, Marston Owd Roger, Greene King Strong Suffolk Ale, Theakston Old Peculier.

17C Wee Heavy

Rich, malty, dextrinous, and usually caramel-sweet, these beers can give an impression that is suggestive of a dessert. Complex secondary malt and alcohol flavors prevent a one-dimensional quality. Strength and maltiness can vary, but should not be cloying or syrupy.
Commercial Examples: Traquair House Ale, Belhaven Wee Heavy, McEwan’s Scotch Ale, MacAndrew’s Scotch Ale, Orkney Skull Splitter, Inveralmond Black Friar, Broughton Old Jock, Gordon Highland Scotch Ale, AleSmith Wee Heavy.

17D English Barleywine

A showcase of malty richness and complex, intense flavors. Chewy and rich in body, with warming alcohol and a pleasant fruity or hoppy interest. When aged, it can take on port-like flavors. A wintertime sipper.
Commercial Examples: Adnam’s Tally Ho, Burton Bridge Thomas Sykes Old Ale, J.W. Lee’s Vintage Harvest Ale, Fuller’s Vintage Ale, Robinson’s Old Tom, Fuller’s Golden Pride, Whitbread Gold Label.

18A Blonde Ale

Easy-drinking, approachable, malt-oriented American craft beer, often with interesting fruit, hop, or character malt notes. Well-balanced and clean, is a refreshing pint without aggressive flavors.
Commercial Examples: Kona Big Wave, Pelican Kiwanda Cream Ale, Victory Summer Love, Russian River Aud Blonde, Widmer Blonde Ale.

18B American Pale Ale

A pale, refreshing and hoppy ale, yet with sufficient supporting malt to make the beer balanced and drinkable. The clean hop presence can reflect classic or modern American or New World hop varieties with a wide range of characteristics. An average-strength hop-forward pale American craft beer, generally balanced to be more accessible than modern American IPAs.
Commercial Examples: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Firestone Walker Pale 31, Deschutes Mirror Pond, Great Lakes Burning River, Flying Dog Doggie Style, Troegs Pale Ale, Big Sky Scape Goat.

19A American Amber Ale

An amber, hoppy, moderate-strength American craft beer with a caramel malty flavor. The balance can vary quite a bit, with some versions being fairly malty and others being aggressively hoppy. Hoppy and bitter versions should not have clashing flavors with the caramel malt profile.
Commercial Examples: Troegs HopBack Amber Ale, Kona Lavaman Red Ale, Full Sail Amber, Deschutes Cinder Cone Red, Rogue American Amber Ale, Anderson Valley Boont Amber Ale, McNeill’s Firehouse Amber Ale, Mendocino Red Tail Ale.

19B California Common

A lightly fruity beer with firm, grainy maltiness, interesting toasty and caramel flavors, and showcasing the signature Northern Brewer varietal hop character.
Commercial Examples: Anchor Steam, Steamworks Steam Engine Lager, Flying Dog Old Scratch Amber Lager, Schlafly Pi Common.

19C American Brown Ale

A malty but hoppy beer frequently with chocolate and caramel flavors. The hop flavor and aroma complements and enhances the malt rather than clashing with it.
Commercial Examples: Big Sky Moose Drool Brown Ale, Cigar City Maduro Brown Ale, Bell’s Best Brown, Smuttynose Old Brown Dog Ale, Brooklyn Brown Ale, Lost Coast Downtown Brown, Avery Ellie’s Brown Ale.

20A American Porter

A substantial, malty dark beer with a complex and flavorful dark malt character.
Commercial Examples: Great Lakes Edmund Fitzgerald Porter, Anchor Porter, Smuttynose Robust Porter, Sierra Nevada Porter, Deschutes Black Butte Porter, Boulevard Bully! Porter.

20B American Stout

A fairly strong, highly roasted, bitter, hoppy dark stout. Has the body and dark flavors typical of stouts with a more aggressive American hop character and bitterness.
Commercial Examples: Rogue Shakespeare Stout, Deschutes Obsidian Stout, Sierra Nevada Stout, North Coast Old No. 38, Avery Out of Bounds Stout.

20C Imperial Stout

An intensely-flavored, big, dark ale with a wide range of flavor balances and regional interpretations. Roasty-burnt malt with deep dark or dried fruit flavors, and a warming, bittersweet finish. Despite the intense flavors, the components need to meld together to create a complex, harmonious beer, not a hot mess.
Commercial Examples: American - North Coast Old Rasputin Imperial Stout, Cigar City Marshal Zhukov’s Imperial Stout; English - Courage Imperial Russian Stout, Le Coq Imperial Extra Double Stout, Samuel Smith Imperial Stout.

21A American IPA

A decidedly hoppy and bitter, moderately strong American pale ale, showcasing modern American and New World hop varieties. The balance is hop-forward, with a clean fermentation profile, dryish finish, and clean, supporting malt allowing a creative range of hop character to shine through.
Commercial Examples: Russian River Blind Pig IPA, Bell’s Two-Hearted Ale, Firestone Walker Union Jack, Alpine Duet, New Belgium Ranger IPA, Fat Heads Head Hunter, Stone IPA, Lagunitas IPA.

21B Specialty IPA

Recognizable as an IPA by balance - a hop-forward, bitter, dryish beer - with something else present to distinguish it from the standard categories. Should have good drinkability, regardless of the form. Excessive harshness and heaviness are typically faults, as are strong flavor clashes between the hops and the other specialty ingredients.
Entry Instructions: Entrant MUST specify a strength (session: 3.0-5.0%, standard: 5.0-7.5%, double: 7.5-9.5%); if no strength is specified, standard will be assumed. Entrant MUST specify specific type of Specialty IPA from the library of known types listed in the Style Guidelines, or as amended by the BJCP web site; or the entrant must describe the type of Specialty IPA and its key characteristics in comment form so judges will know what to expect. Entrants MAY specify specific hop varieties used, if entrants feel that judges may not recognize the varietal characteristics of newer hops. Entrants MAY specify a combination of defined IPA types (e.g., Black Rye IPA) without providing additional descriptions. Entrants may use this category for a different strength version of an IPA defined by its own BJCP subcategory (e.g., session-strength American or English IPA) - except where an existing BJCP subcategory already exists for that style (e.g., double [American] IPA). Currently Defined Types: Black IPA, Brown IPA, White IPA, Rye IPA, Belgian IPA, Red IPA.

22A Double IPA

An intensely hoppy, fairly strong pale ale without the big, rich, complex maltiness and residual sweetness and body of an American barleywine. Strongly hopped, but clean, dry, and lacking harshness. Drinkability is an important characteristic; this should not be a heavy, sipping beer.
Commercial Examples: Russian River Pliny the Elder, Port Brewing Hop 15, Three Floyds Dreadnaught, Avery Majaraja, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Alchemist Heady Topper, Bell’s Hopslam, Stone Ruination IPA, Great Divide Hercules Double IPA, Rogue XS Imperial India Pale Ale, Fat Heads Hop Juju, Alesmith Yulesmith Summer, Sierra Nevada Hoptimum.

22B American Strong Ale

A strong, full-flavored American ale that challenges and rewards the palate with full malty and hoppy flavors and substantial bitterness. The flavors are bold but complementary, and are stronger and richer than average-strength pale and amber American ales.
Commercial Examples: Stone Arrogant Bastard, Great Lakes Nosferatu, Bear Republic Red Rocket Ale, Terrapin Big Hoppy Monster, Lagunitas Censored, Port Brewing Shark Attack Double Red.

22C American Barleywine

A well-hopped American interpretation of the richest and strongest of the English ales. The hop character should be evident throughout, but does not have to be unbalanced. The alcohol strength and hop bitterness often combine to leave a very long finish.
Commercial Examples: Sierra Nevada Bigfoot, Great Divide Old Ruffian, Victory Old Horizontal, Rogue Old Crustacean, Avery Hog Heaven Barleywine, Bell’s Third Coast Old Ale, Anchor Old Foghorn, Three Floyds Behemoth, Stone Old Guardian, Bridgeport Old Knucklehead, Hair of the Dog Doggie Claws, Lagunitas Olde GnarleyWine, Smuttynose Barleywine, Flying Dog Horn Dog.

22D Wheatwine

A richly textured, high alcohol sipping beer with a significant grainy, bready flavor and sleek body. The emphasis is first on the bready, wheaty flavors with interesting complexity from malt, hops, fruity yeast character and alcohol complexity.
Commercial Examples: Rubicon Brewing Company Winter Wheat Wine, Two Brothers Bare Trees Weiss Wine, Smuttynose Wheat Wine, Boulevard Brewing Company Harvest Dance, Portsmouth Wheat Wine.

23A Berliner Weisse

A very pale, refreshing, low-alcohol German wheat beer with a clean lactic sourness and a very high carbonation level. A light bread dough malt flavor supports the sourness, which shouldn’t seem artificial or funky.
Commercial Examples: Schultheiss Berliner Weisse, Berliner Kindl Weisse, Nodding Head Berliner Weisse, Bahnhof Berliner Style Weisse, New Glarus Berliner Weiss.

23B Flanders Red Ale

A complex, sour, fruity, red wine-like Belgian-style ale with interesting supportive malt flavors and a melange of fruit complexity. The dry finish and tannin completes the mental image of a fine red wine.
Commercial Examples: Rodenbach Grand Cru, Rodenbach Klassiek, Bellegems Bruin, Duchesse de Bourgogne, Petrus Oud Bruin, Southampton Flanders Red Ale.

23C Oud Bruin

A malty, fruity, aged, somewhat sour Belgian-style brown ale.
Commercial Examples: Liefman’s Goudenband, Liefman’s Odnar, Liefman’s Oud Bruin, Ichtegem Old Brown, Riva Vondel.

23D Lambic

A fairly sour, often moderately funky wild Belgian wheat beer with sourness taking the place of hop bitterness in the balance. Traditionally spontaneously fermented in the Brussels area and served uncarbonated, the refreshing acidity makes for a very pleasant cafe drink.
Commercial Examples: The only bottled version readily available is Cantillon Grand Cru Bruocsella of whatever single batch vintage the brewer deems worthy to bottle. De Cam sometimes bottles their very old (5 years) lambic. In and around Brussels there are specialty cafes that often have draught lambics from traditional brewers or blenders such as Boon, De Cam, Cantillon, Drie Fonteinen, Lindemans, Timmermans and Girardin.

23E Gueuze

A complex, pleasantly sour but balanced wild Belgian wheat beer that is highly carbonated and very refreshing. The spontaneous fermentation character can provide a very interesting complexity, with a wide range of wild barnyard, horse blanket, or leather characteristics intermingling with citrusy-fruity flavors and acidity
Commercial Examples: Boon Oude Gueuze, Boon Oude Gueuze Mariage Parfait, De Cam Gueuze, De Cam/Drei Fonteinen Millennium Gueuze, Drie Fonteinen Oud Gueuze, Cantillon Gueuze, Hanssens Oude Gueuze, Lindemans Gueuze Cuvee Rene, Girardin Gueuze (Black Label), Mort Subite (Unfiltered) Gueuze, Oud Beersel Oude Gueuze.

23F Fruit Lambic

A complex, fruity, pleasantly sour, wild wheat ale fermented by a variety of Belgian microbiota, and showcasing the fruit contributions blended with the wild character.
Commercial Examples: Boon Framboise Marriage Parfait, Boon Kriek Mariage Parfait, Boon Oude Kriek, Cantillon Fou’ Foune, Cantillon Kriek, Cantillon Lou Pepe Kriek, Cantillon Lou Pepe Framboise, Cantillon Rose de Gambrinus, Cantillon St. Lamvinus, Cantillon Vigneronne, De Cam Oude Kriek, Drie Fonteinen Kriek, Girardin Kriek, Hanssens Oude Kriek, Oud Beersel Kriek, Mort Subite Kriek.
Entry Instructions: The type of fruit used must be specified. The brewer must declare a carbonation level (low, medium, high) and a sweetness level (low/none, medium, high).

24A Witbier

A refreshing, elegant, tasty, moderate-strength wheat-based ale.
Commercial Examples: Hoegaarden Wit, St. Bernardus Blanche, Celis White, Vuuve 5, Brugs Tarwebier (Blanche de Bruges), Wittekerke, Allagash White, Blanche de Bruxelles, Ommegang Witte, Avery White Rascal, Unibroue Blanche de Chambly, Sterkens White Ale, Bell’s Winter White Ale, Victory Whirlwind Witbier, Hitachino Nest White Ale.

24B Belgian Pale Ale

A moderately malty, somewhat fruity-spicy, easy-drinking, copper-colored Belgian ale that is somewhat less aggressive in flavor profile than many other Belgian beers. The malt character tends to be a bit biscuity with light toasty, honey-like, or caramelly components; the fruit character is noticeable and complementary to the malt. The bitterness level is generally moderate, but may not seem as high due to the flavorful malt profile.
Commercial Examples: De Koninck, Speciale Palm, Dobble Palm, Russian River Perdition, Ginder Ale, Op-Ale, St. Pieters Zinnebir, Brewer’s Art House Pale Ale, Avery Karma, Eisenbahn Pale Ale, Blue Moon Pale Moon.

24C Biere de Garde

A fairly strong, malt-accentuated, lagered artisanal beer with a range of malt flavors appropriate for the color. All are malty yet dry, with clean flavors and a smooth character. Three main variations are included in the style: the brown (brune), the blond (blonde), and the amber (ambree). The darker versions will have more malt character, while the paler versions can have more hops (but still are malt-focused beers). A related style is Biere de Mars, which is brewed in March (Mars) for present use and will not age as well. Attenuation rates are in the 80-85% range. Some fuller-bodied examples exist, but these are somewhat rare. Age and oxidation in imports often increases fruitiness, caramel flavors, and adds corked and musty notes; these are all signs of mishandling, not characteristic elements of the style.
Commercial Examples: Ch'Ti (brown and blond), Jenlain (amber and blond), La Choulette (all 3 versions), St. Amand (brown), Saint Sylvestre 3 Monts (blond), Russian River Perdition.
Entry Instructions: Entrant MUST specify blond, amber, or brown biere de garde. If no color is specified, the judge should attempt to judge based on initial observation, expecting a malt flavor and balance that matches the color.

25A Belgian Blond Ale

A moderate-strength golden ale that has a subtle fruity-spicy Belgian yeast complexity, slightly malty-sweet flavor, and dry finish.
Commercial Examples: Leffe Blond, Affligem Blond, La Trappe (Koningshoeven) Blond, Grimbergen Blond, Val-Dieu Blond.

25B Saison

Most commonly, a pale, refreshing, highly-attenuated, moderately-bitter, moderate-strength Belgian ale with a very dry finish. Typically highly carbonated, and using non-barley cereal grains and optional spices for complexity, as complements the expressive yeast character that is fruity, spicy, and not overly phenolic. Less common variations include both lower-alcohol and higher-alcohol products, as well as darker versions with additional malt character.
Commercial Examples: Ellezelloise Saison, Fanome Saison, Lefebvre Saison 1900, Saison Dupont Vieille Provision, Saison de Pipaix, Saison Regal, Saison Voisin, Boulevard Tank 7 Farmhouse Ale.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify the strength (table, standard, super) and the color (pale, dark).

25C Belgian Golden Strong Ale

A pale, complex, effervescent, strong Belgian-style ale that is highly attenuated and features fruity and hoppy notes in preference to phenolics.
Commercial Examples: Duvel, Russian River Damnation, Hapkin, Lucifer, Brigand, Judas, Delirium Tremens, Dulle Teve, Piraat, Great Divide Hades, Avery Salvation, North Coast Pranqster, Unibroue Eau Benite, AleSmith Horny Devil.

26A Trappist Single

A pale, bitter, highly attenuated and well carbonated Trappist ale, showing a fruity-spicy Trappist yeast character, a spicy-floral hop profile, and a soft, supportive grainy-sweet malt palate.
Commercial Examples: Westvleteren Blond (green cap), Westmalle Extra, Achel 5 Blond, Chimay Doree, Lost Abbey Devotion.

26B Belgian Dubbel

A deep reddish-copper, moderately strong, malty, complex Trappist ale with rich malty flavors, dark or dried fruit esters, and light alcohol blended together in a malty presentation that still finishes fairly dry. Comments: Most commercial examples are in the 6.5 - 7% ABV range. Traditionally bottle-conditioned ("refermented in the bottle").
Commercial Examples: Westmalle Dubbel, St. Bernardus Pater 6, La Trappe Dubbel, Corsendonk Abbey Brown Ale, Grimbergen Double, Affligem Dubbel, Chimay Premiere (Red), Pater Lieven Bruin, Duinen Dubbel, St. Feuillien Brune, New Belgium Abbey Belgian Style Ale, Stoudts Abbey Double Ale, Russian River Benediction, Flying Fish Dubbel, Lost Abbey Lost and Found Abbey Ale, Allagash Double.

26C Belgian Tripel

A pale, somewhat spicy, dry, strong Trappist ale with a pleasant rounded malt flavor and firm bitterness. Quite aromatic, with spicy, fruity, and light alcohol notes combining with the supportive clean malt character to produce a surprisingly drinkable beverage considering the high alcohol level.
Commercial Examples: Westmalle Tripel, La Rulles Tripel, St. Bernardus Tripel, Chimay Cinq Cents (White), Watou Tripel, Val-Dieu Triple, Affligem Tripel, Grimbergen Tripel, La Trappe Tripel, Witkap Pater Tripel, Corsendonk Abbey Pale Ale, St. Feuillien Tripel.

26D Belgian Dark Strong Ale

A dark, complex, very strong Belgian ale with a delicious blend of malt richness, dark fruit flavors, and spicy elements. Complex, rich, smooth and dangerous.
Commercial Examples: Westvleteren 12, Rochefort 10, St. Bernardus Abt 12, Gouden Carolus Grand Cru of the Emperor, Achel Extra Brune, Rochefort 8, Southampton Abbot 12, Chimay Grande Reserve, Lost Abbey Judgment Day.

27A Historical Beer

The Historical Beer category contains styles that either have all but died out in modern times, or that were much more popular in past times and are known only through recreations. This category can also be used for traditional or indigenous beers of cultural importance within certain countries. Placing a beer in the historical category does not imply that it is not currently being produced, just that it is a very minor style or perhaps is in the process of rediscovery by craft brewers.
Entry Instructions: The entrant must either specify a style with a BJCP-supplied description, or provide a similar description for the judges of a different style. If a beer is entered with just a style name and no description, it is very unlikely that judges will understand how to judge it. Currently defined examples: Gose, Piwo Grodziskie, Lichtenhainer, Roggenbier, Sahti, Kentucky Common, Pre-Prohibition Lager, Pre-Prohibition Porter, London Brown Ale.

28A Brett Beer

An interesting and refreshing variation on the base style, often drier and fruitier than expected, with at most a light acidity. Funky notes are generally restrained in 100% Brett examples, except in older examples.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify either a base beer style (classic BJCP style, or a generic style family) or provide a description of the ingredients/specs/desired character. The entrant MUST specify if a 100% Brett fermentation was conducted. The entrant MAY specify the strain(s) of Brettanomyces used, along with a brief description of its character.

28B Mixed Fermentation Sour Beer

A sour and/or funky version of a base style of beer.
Commercial Examples: Bruery Tart of Darkness, Jolly Pumpkin Calabaza Blanca, Cascade Vlad the Imp Aler, Russian River Temptation, Boulevard Love Child, Hill Farmstead Bi
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a description of the beer, identifying the yeast/bacteria used and either a base style or the ingredients/specs/target character of the beer.

28C Wild Specialty Beer

A sour and/or funky version of a fruit, herb, or spice beer, or a wild beer aged in wood. If wood-aged, the wood should not be the primary or dominant character.
Commercial Examples: Cascade Bourbonic Plague, Jester King Atrial Rubicite, New Glarus Belgian Red, Russian River Supplication, The Lost Abbey Cuvee de Tomme.
Entry Instructions: Entrant MUST specify the type of fruit, spice, herb, or wood used. Entrant MUST specify a description of the beer, identifying the yeast/bacteria used and either a base style or the ingredients/specs/target character of the beer. A general description of the special nature of the beer can cover all the required items.

29A Fruit Beer

A harmonious marriage of fruit and beer, but still recognizable as a beer. The fruit character should be evident but in balance with the beer, not so forward as to suggest an artificial product.
Commercial Examples: Bell’s Cherry Stout, Dogfish Head Aprihop, Great Divide Wild Raspberry Ale, Ebulum Elderberry Black Ale.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a base style; the declared style does not have to be a Classic Style. The entrant MUST specify the type of fruit used. Soured fruit beers that aren't lambics should be entered in the American Wild Ale category.

29B Fruit and Spice Beer

A harmonious marriage of fruit, spice, and beer, but still recognizable as a beer. The fruit and spice character should each be evident but in balance with the beer, not so forward as to suggest an artificial product.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a base style; the declared style does not have to be a Classic Style. The entrant MUST specify the type of fruit and spices, herbs, or vegetables (SHV) used; individual SHV ingredients do not need to be specified if a well-known blend of spices is used (e.g., apple pie spice).

29C Speciality Fruit Beer

A harmonious marriage of fruit, sugar, and beer, but still recognizable as a beer. The fruit and sugar character should both be evident but in balance with the beer, not so forward as to suggest an artificial product.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a base style; the declared style does not have to be a Classic Style. The entrant MUST specify the type of fruit used. The entrant MUST specify the type of additional fermentable sugar or special process employed.

30A Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Beer

A harmonious marriage of SHV and beer, but still recognizable as a beer. The SHV character should be evident but in balance with the beer, not so forward as to suggest an artificial product.
Commercial Examples: Alesmith Speedway Stout, Founders Breakfast Stout, Traquair Jacobite Ale, Rogue Chipotle Ale, Young’s Double Chocolate Stout, Bell’s Java Stout, Elysian Avatar IPA.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a base style; the declared style does not have to be a Classic Style. The entrant MUST specify the type of spices, herbs, or vegetables used; individual ingredients do not need to be specified if a well-known blend of spices is used (e.g., apple pie spice).

30B Autumn Seasonal Beer

An amber to copper, spiced beer that often has a moderately rich body and slightly warming finish suggesting a good accompaniment for the cool fall season, and often evocative of Thanksgiving traditions.
Commercial Examples: Dogfish Head Punkin Ale, Southampton Pumpkin Ale.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a base style; the declared style does not have to be a Classic Style. The entrant MUST specify the type of spices, herbs, or vegetables used; individual ingredients do not need to be specified if a well-known blend of spices is used (e.g., pumpkin pie spice). The beer must contain spices, and may contain vegetables and/or sugars.

30C Winter Seasonal Beer

A stronger, darker, spiced beer that often has a rich body and warming finish suggesting a good accompaniment for the cold winter season.
Commercial Examples: Anchor Our Special Ale, Harpoon Winter Warmer, Weyerbacher Winter Ale, Goose Island Christmas Ale, Great Lakes Christmas Ale, Lakefront Holiday Spice Lager Beer.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a base style; the declared style does not have to be a Classic Style. The entrant MUST specify the type of spices, sugars, fruits, or additional fermentables used; individual ingredients do not need to be specified if a well-known blend of spices is used (e.g., mulling spice).

31A Alternative Grain Beer

A base beer enhanced by the flavor of additional grain.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a base style; the declared style does not have to be a Classic Style. The entrant MUST specify the type of alternative grain used.

31B Alternative Sugar Beer

A harmonious marriage of sugar and beer, but still recognizable as a beer. The sugar character should both be evident but in balance with the beer, not so forward as to suggest an artificial product.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a base style; the declared style does not have to be a Classic Style. The entrant MUST specify the type of sugar used.

32A Classic Style Smoked Beer

A smoke-enhanced beer showing good balance between the smoke and beer character, while remaining pleasant to drink. Balance in the use of smoke, hops and malt character is exhibited by the better examples.
Commercial Examples: Alaskan Smoked Porter, Spezial Lagerbier, Weissbier and Bockbier, Stone Smoked Porter, Schlenkerla Weizen Rauchbier and Ur-Bock Rauchbier.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a Classic Style base beer. The entrant MUST specify the type of wood or smoke if a varietal smoke character is noticeable.

32B Specialty Smoked Beer

A smoke-enhanced beer showing good balance between the smoke, the beer character, and the added ingredients, while remaining pleasant to drink. Balance in the use of smoke, hops and malt character is exhibited by the better examples.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify a base beer style; the base beer does not have to be a Classic Style. The entrant MUST specify the type of wood or smoke if a varietal smoke character is noticeable. The entrant MUST specify the additional ingredients or processes that make this a specialty smoked beer.

33A Wood-Aged Beer

A harmonious blend of the base beer style with characteristics from aging in contact with wood. The best examples will be smooth, flavorful, well-balanced and well-aged.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify the type of wood used and the char level (if charred). The entrant MUST specify the base style; the base style can be either a classic BJCP style (i.e., a named subcategory) or may be a generic type of beer (e.g., porter, brown ale). If an unusual wood has been used, the entrant must supply a brief description of the sensory aspects the wood adds to beer.

33B Specialty Wood-Aged Beer

A harmonious blend of the base beer style with characteristics from aging in contact with wood (including alcoholic products previously in contact with the wood). The best examples will be smooth, flavorful, well-balanced and well-aged.
Commercial Examples: The Lost Abbey Angel's Share Ale, J.W. Lees Harvest Ale in Port, Sherry, Lagavulin Whisky or Calvados Casks, Founders Kentucky Breakfast Stout, Goose Island Bourbon County Stout, many microbreweries have specialty beers served only on premises often directly from the cask.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify the additional alcohol character, with information about the barrel if relevant to the finished flavor profile. The entrant MUST specify the base style; the base style can be either a classic BJCP style (i.e., a named subcategory) or may be a generic type of beer (e.g., porter, brown ale). If an unusual wood or ingredient has been used, the entrant must supply a brief description of the sensory aspects the ingredients adds to the beer.

34A Clone Beer

Based on declared clone beer.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify the name of the commercial beer being cloned, specifications (vital statistics) for the beer, and either a brief sensory description or a list of ingredients used in making the beer. Without this information, judges who are unfamiliar with the beer will have no basis for comparison.

34B Mixed-Style Beer

Based on the declared base styles. As with all Specialty-Type Beers, the resulting combination of beer styles needs to be harmonious and balanced, and be pleasant to drink.
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify the styles being mixed. The entrant may provide an additional description of the sensory profile of the beer or the vital statistics of the resulting beer.

34C Experimental Beer

This style is the ultimate in creativity, since it cannot represent a well-known commercial beer (otherwise it would be a clone beer) and cannot fit into any other existing Specialty-Type style (including those within this major category).
Entry Instructions: The entrant MUST specify the special nature of the experimental beer, including the special ingredients or processes that make it not fit elsewhere in the guidelines. The entrant MUST provide vital statistics for the beer, and either a brief sensory description or a list of ingredients used in making the beer. Without this information, judges will have no basis for comparison.

M1A Dry Mead

Similar in balance, body, finish and flavor intensity to a dry white wine, with a pleasant mixture of subtle honey character, soft fruity esters, and clean alcohol. Complexity, harmony, and balance of sensory elements are most desirable, with no inconsistencies in color, aroma, flavor or aftertaste. The proper balance of sweetness, acidity, alcohol, and honey character is the essential final measure of any mead.
Commercial Examples: White Winter Dry Mead, Sky River Dry Mead, Intermiel Bouquet Printanier.
Entry Instructions: Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level and strength. Sweetness is assumed to be DRY in this category. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties.

M1B Semi-Sweet Mead

Similar in balance, body, finish and flavor intensity to a semisweet (or medium-dry) white wine, with a pleasant mixture of honey character, light sweetness, soft fruity esters, and clean alcohol. Complexity, harmony, and balance of sensory elements are most desirable, with no inconsistencies in color, aroma, flavor or aftertaste. The proper balance of sweetness, acidity, alcohol, and honey character is the essential final measure of any mead.
Commercial Examples: Lurgashall English Mead, Redstone Traditional Mountain Honey Wine, Sky River Semi-Sweet Mead, Intermiel Verge d’Or and Melilot.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level and strength. Sweetness is assumed to be SEMI-SWEET in this category. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties.

M1C Sweet Mead

Similar in balance, body, finish and flavor intensity to a well-made dessert wine (such as Sauternes), with a pleasant mixture of honey character, residual sweetness, soft fruity esters, and clean alcohol. Complexity, harmony, and balance of sensory elements are most desirable, with no inconsistencies in color, aroma, flavor or aftertaste. The proper balance of sweetness, acidity, alcohol, and honey character is the essential final measure of any mead.
Commercial Examples: Moonlight Sensual, Lurgashall Christmas Mead, Chaucer’s Mead, Rabbit’s Foot Sweet Wildflower Honey Mead, Intermiel Benoite.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level and strength. Sweetness is assumed to be SWEET in this category. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties.

M2A Cyser

In well-made examples of the style, the fruit is both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Some of the best strong examples have the taste and aroma of an aged Calvados (apple brandy from northern France), while subtle, dry versions can taste similar to many fine white wines. There should be an appealing blend of the fruit and honey character but not necessarily an even balance. Generally a good tannin-sweetness balance is desired, though very dry and very sweet examples do exist.
Commercial Examples: Moonlight Blossom, White Winter Cyser, Rabbit’s Foot Apple Cyser.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MAY specify the varieties of apple used; if specified, a varietal character will be expected. Products with a relatively low proportion of honey are better entered as a Specialty Cider. A spiced cyser should be entered as a Fruit and Spice Mead. A cyser with other fruit should be entered as a Melomel. A cyser with additional ingredients should be entered as an Experimental mead.

M2B Pyment

In well-made examples of the style, the grape is both distinctively vinous and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. White and red versions can be quite different, and the overall impression should be characteristic of the type of grapes used and suggestive of a similar variety wine. There should be an appealing blend of the fruit and honey character but not necessarily an even balance. Generally a good tannin-sweetness balance is desired, though very dry and very sweet examples do exist.
Commercial Examples: Celestial Meads Que Syrah, Moonlight Slow Dance, Redstone Pinot Noir and White Pyment Mountain Honey Wines.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MAY specify the varieties of grape used; if specified, a varietal character will be expected. A spiced pyment (hippocras) should be entered as a Fruit and Spice Mead. A pyment made with other fruit should be entered as a Melomel. A pyment with other ingredients should be entered as an Experimental Mead.

M2C Berry Mead

In well-made examples of the style, the fruit is both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Different types of fruit can result in widely different characteristics; allow for a variation in the final product.
Commercial Examples: Moonlight Blissful, Wild, Caress, and Mischief, White Winter Blueberry, Raspberry and Strawberry Melomels, Celestial Meads Miel Noir, Redstone Black Raspberry Nectar, Bees Brothers Raspberry Mead, Intermiel Honey Wine and Raspberries, Honey Wine and Blueberries, and Honey Wine and Blackcurrants, Mountain Meadows Cranberry Mead.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MUST specify the varieties of fruit used. A mead made with both berries and non-berry fruit (including apples and grapes) should be entered as a Melomel. A berry mead that is spiced should be entered as a Fruit and Spice Mead. A berry mead containing other ingredients should be entered as an Experimental Mead.

M2D Stone Fruit Mead

In well-made examples of the style, the fruit is both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Different types of fruit can result in widely different characteristics; allow for a variation in the final product.
Commercial Examples: Mountain Meadows Cherry Mead, Moonlight Entice, Sumptuous, Flirt, and Smitten, Redstone Sunshine Nectar.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MUST specify the varieties of fruit used. A stone fruit mead that is spiced should be entered as a Fruit and Spice Mead. A stone fruit mead that contains non-stone fruit should be entered as a Melomel. A stone fruit mead that contains other ingredients should be entered as an Experimental Mead.

M2E Melomel

In well-made examples of the style, the fruit is both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Different types of fruit can result in widely different characteristics; allow for a variation in the final product.
Commercial Examples: Moonlight Desire, Paramour, and Iniquity.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MUST specify the varieties of fruit used. A melomel that is spiced should be entered as a Fruit and Spice Mead. A melomel containing other ingredients should be entered as an Experimental Mead. Melomels made with either apples or grapes as the only fruit source should be entered as Cysers and Pyments, respectively. Melomels with apples or grapes, plus other fruit should be entered in this category, not Experimental.

M3A Fruit and Spice Mead

In well-made examples of the style, the fruits and spices are both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Different types of fruits and spices can result in widely different characteristics; allow for significant variation in the final product.
Commercial Examples: Moonlight Kurt’s Apple Pie, Mojo, Flame, Fling, and Deviant, Celestial Meads Scheherazade, Rabbit’s Foot Private Reserve Pear Mead, Intermiel Rosee.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MUST specify the types of spices used, (although well-known spice blends may be referred to by common name, such as apple pie spices). Entrants MUST specify the types of fruits used. If only combinations of spices are used, enter as a Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Mead. If only combinations of fruits are used, enter as a Melomel. If other types of ingredients are used, enter as an Experimental Mead.

M3B Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Mead

In well-made examples of the style, the spices are both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Different types of spices can result in widely different characteristics; allow for a variation in the final product.
Commercial Examples: Moonlight Wicked, Breathless, Madagascar, and Seduction, Redstone Vanilla Beans and Cinnamon Sticks Mountain Honey Wine, Bonair Chili.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MUST specify the types of spices used (although well-known spice blends may be referred to by common name, such as apple pie spices)

M4A Braggot

A harmonious blend of mead and beer, with the distinctive characteristics of both. A wide range of results are possible, depending on the base style of beer, variety of honey and overall sweetness and strength. Beer flavors tend to somewhat mask typical honey flavors found in other meads. and honey, although the specific balance is open to creative interpretation by brewers.
Commercial Examples: Rabbit’s Foot Diabhal and Biere de Miele, Magic Hat Braggot, Brother Adams Braggot Barleywine Ale, White Winter Traditional Brackett.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MAY specify the base style or beer or types of malt used. Products with a relatively low proportion of honey should be entered in the Spiced Beer category as a Honey Beer.

M4B Historical Mead

This mead should exhibit the character of all of the ingredients in varying degrees, and should show a good blending or balance between the various flavor elements. Whatever ingredients are included, the result should be identifiable as a honey-based fermented beverage.
Commercial Examples: Jadwiga, Saba Tej.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MUST specify the special nature of the mead, providing a description of the mead for judges if no such description is available from the BJCP.

M4C Experimental Mead

This mead should exhibit the character of all of the ingredients in varying degrees, and should show a good blending or balance between the various flavor elements. Whatever ingredients are included, the result should be identifiable as a honey-based fermented beverage.
Commercial Examples: Moonlight Utopian, Hanssens/Lurgashall Mead the Gueuze, White Winter Cherry Bracket, Mountain Meadows Trickster’s Treat Agave Mead.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MUST specify the special nature of the mead, whether it is a combination of existing styles, an experimental mead, or some other creation. Any special ingredients that impart an identifiable character MAY be declared.

C1A New World Cider

A refreshing drink of some substance - not bland or watery. Sweet ciders must not be cloying. Dry ciders must not be too austere.
Commercial Examples: [US] Uncle John’s Fruit House Winery Apple Hard Cider, Tandem Ciders Pretty Penny (MI), Bellwether Spyglass (NY), West County Pippin (MA), White Winter Hard Apple Cider (WI), Wandering Aengus Ciderworks Bloom (OR), &Aelig;ppeltreow Appely Brut and Doux (WI).

C1B English Cider

Generally dry, full-bodied, austere. Complex flavor profile, long finish.
Commercial Examples: [US] Westcott Bay Traditional Very Dry, Dry and Medium Sweet (WA), Farnum Hill Extra-Dry, Dry, and Farmhouse (NH), Wandering Aengus Dry Cider (OR), Montana CiderWorks North Fork (MT), Bellwether Heritage (NY). [UK] Oliver’s Traditional Dry, Hogan’s Dry and Medium Dry, Henney’s Dry and Vintage Still, Burrow Hill Medium, Aspall English Imperial.

C1C French Cider

Medium to sweet, full-bodied, rich.
Commercial Examples: [US] West County Reine de Pomme (MA), [France] Eric Bordelet (various), Etienne Dupont, Etienne Dupont Organic, Bellot.

C1D New World Perry

Mild. Medium to medium-sweet. Still to lightly sparkling. Only very slight acetification is acceptable. Mousiness, ropy/oily characters are serious faults.
Commercial Examples: [US] White Winter Hard Pear Cider (WI), Uncle John’s Fruit House Winery Perry (MI).

C1E Traditional Perry

Tannic. Medium to medium-sweet. Still to lightly sparkling. Only very slight acetification is acceptable. Mousiness and ropy/oily characters are serious faults.
Commercial Examples: [US] Appeltreow Orchard Oriole Perry (WI); [France] Bordelet Poire Authentique and Poire Granit, Christian Drouin Poire, [UK] Oliver’s Classic, Blakeney Red, and Herefordshire Dry; Hogan’s Vintage Perry.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (3 levels). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (5 categories). Entrants MUST state variety of pear(s) used.

C2A New England Cider

Substantial body and character. Typically relatively dry, but can be somewhat sweet if in balance and not containing hot alcohol.
Commercial Examples: [US] Snowdrift Semi-Dry (WA), Blackbird Cider Works New England Style (NY).
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify if the cider was barrel-fermented or aged. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (3 levels). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (5 levels).

C2B Cider with Other Fruit

Substantial. May be significantly tannic, depending on fruit added.
Commercial Examples: [US] West County Blueberry-Apple Wine (MA), Bellwether Cherry Street (NY), Uncle John’s Fruit Farm Winery Apple Cherry, Apple Blueberry, and Apricot Apple Hard Cider (MI).
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (3 levels). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (5 categories). Entrants MUST specify all fruit(s) and/or fruit juice(s) added.

C2C Applewine

Typically like a dry white wine, balanced, and with low astringency and bitterness.
Commercial Examples: [US] Uncle John’s Fruit House Winery Fruit House Apple (MI), McClure’s Sweet Apple Wine (IN).
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (3 levels). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (5 levels).

C2D Ice Cider

This is a cider style in which the juice is concentrated before fermentation either by freezing fruit before pressing or freezing juice and removing water.
Commercial Examples: [US] various from Eden Ice Cider Company and Champlain Orchards. [Canada] Domaine Pinnacle, Les Vergers de la Colline, and Cidrerie St-Nicolas (Quebec).
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify starting gravity, final gravity or residual sugar, and alcohol level. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (3 levels).

C2E Cider with Herbs/Spices

Like a white wine with complex flavors. The apple character must marry with the botanicals and give a balanced result.
Commercial Examples: [US] Colorado Cider Grasshop-ah (CO), Wandering Aengus Anthem Hops (OR).
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (3 levels). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (5 categories). Entrants MUST specify all botanicals added. If hops are used, entrant MUST specify variety/varieties used.

C2F Specialty Cider/Perry

This is an open-ended category for cider or perry with other ingredients such that it does not fit any of the other BJCP categories.
Entry Instructions: Entrants MUST specify all ingredients. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (3 levels). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (5 categories).